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contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we will delve deeper into that. what i want to give him a couple of minutes at a moderate is framing a li
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
while the nine america extensions and waivers that he has already given to special interests. nothing has been done. let's try something different. medicare, medicaid costs social security all in the same sentence. medicaid is an entitlement. social security and medicare part taxes. we pay for it. and, you know -- >> we did. >> and i have heard comments, if you keep throwing something up against the wall people start believing it. now people believe medicare, to me and say you're a senior citizen, is sam. how come you're take the step from the government. i pay for social security and medicare. and they keep throwing the same thing. [applause] my question to you is what does you go along with in hoss and brandenstein. >> you made a lot of great points. take the mike. go ahead. >> you were quoted as saying to tea party people as the drunken uncle. >> i was referring to republican congressman, nazi party people. a totally, totally out of contracts ." in terms of social security and medicare, no one is able did not pay into it. i did my whole life. most people honestly particularly on me
does the program under the prior statute to protect america act look at this exact mechanism of targeting persons overseas and held it against the constitutional challenge. that's why it hasn't been reported a very much but that is an opinion of the court review, arbuckle three that have looked at the program and said that it is unlawful. it's hard for me to imagine an oversight regime that would exceed that. the problem -- >> i don't think you are using that -- >> you have to look at the core to -- court. we were prosecutors and seat to get a first warrant. you go to the judge and present the facts and i am not aware of any country in the world that has anything like the court so you could make it adversarial and slow it down and rest. the problem i think is there's a lack of confidence. it is somewhere below headlights and above right now. >> it's hard for us because in the community we depend on the relationship with the intelligence committee to provide the legitimacy that we need in the program to carry them forward. >> where is the abuse? ayaan understand some people th
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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